UTAH'S DIXIE HISTORICAL SITES
SONS OF THE UTAH PIONEER - COTTON MISSION CHAPTER

L05-TERRY STAGE COACH STOP


Where is it? GPS DATA:
 

LOCATION: The Terry Stage Coach and Bullion Stop is located 9.5 miles west of Enterprise, Utah. The old trees across the road were planted about the same time as the building was being built.

GPS: 37 34.408 North 113 42.204 West

Altitude: 5214 ft.


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This unique building was constructed between 1880 and 1885. Silver Bullion was sent by stage and Bullion wagon from the southern Utah mine at Silver Reef, Utah to Pioche, Nevada. Often they were robbed, or in counted an attempted robbery during this long isolated wagon road. This building was built as a stop over place where the wagon or stage coach could be safely stopped and locked up. The Terry Stop was located mid-way between the terminal points of the route. Descendants of the Terry family now own the well-fortified building.

 

TERRY STAGE COACH AND BULLION WAGON STOP

This stage stop was built between 1880 and 1885 by Thomas Sirls Terry. Terry, who had a U.S. Mail contract, built the fortified structure to protect mail carriers and their cargo. Often the cargo included silver bullion which had been processed at Silver Reef, Utah and taken by stage to Pioche or Panaca, Nevada. Rest for the drivers and their horses was necessary on this long journey. Terry built the fort-like barn at his ranch because it was midway between terminal points of the stage route. In addition to the stage chaches which arrived periodically, the structure offered his family and livestock protection from Indian Deprivations. At the time of the construction, Indians were stealing cattle and horses at nearby Barklay in Clover Valley. There was also danger from outlaws stealing the silver bullion.

The bullion laden wagons, which could be driven into the fortification, were doubly secure since horses and men could remain inside. An adjacent stable allowed for horse care and the port holes in the stone walls allowed those inside to shoot their guns if a raid occurred. No such raids took place. Later, the stage stop, loaded with hay, burned to the ground following a summer lightning strike . The Terry family restored the structure to its original design, and they own the property at the present time. Macser and Marilla Terry provided the information for this account.

Sponsored by Cedar City Chapter, Sons of the Utah Pioneers. 1990

 

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